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Now That's Some Slow Mail


A postcard mailed by a soldier during World War II finally arrived at its intended destination in Liverpool more than 77 years later.


The letter, sent in 1943 by 20-year-old Royal Navy recruit William "Bill" Myler Caldwell, after completing his first week of training in the Royal Navy, was intended for his uncle, Fred, who had served in the Navy during the first World War.


Both are long gone, but the postcard was found on Friday by a relative of Caldwell who still lives at the property to which it was addressed in Aigburth, Liverpool.


It is unclear where the postcard has been all these years.


Caldwelll wrote the postcard at the beginning of his military career, during which he would go on to be involved with the D-Day landings and the ground invasion of Nagasaki after the dropping of the atomic bomb.


His daughter told the Telegraph, “When I saw it I thought this is my dad talking, I can hear his voice. The whole family is just staggered, amazed."


“My dad wasn’t really a letter writer, which makes this all the more special," she added. "It is lovely to see his proper cursive handwriting."


A Royal Mail spokesperson said it is “difficult to speculate on what may have happened to this item of mail” although it was likely “put back into the postal system by someone recently, rather than being lost or stuck somewhere in the network.”

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