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Super Lice...why not?


First it was murder hornets. Then it was plague squirrels. And now, 2020 is throwing super lice at us. Lovely.

WGNTV reports that pediatricians are cautioning parents to be aware that lice are developing a resistance to your typical treatments. Meaning, these buggers are now becoming harder and harder to kill.

Dr. Kenneth Polin, a pediatrician that works at Lurie Children’s Primary Care and Town and Country Pediatrics, cautions, "Over the years, as with bacterial infections, and others, the agent of infection, the lice develop resistance. They select for genetics, if you will, that allow them to survive despite what used to be effective treatments."

Dr. Polin also suggests that, should your children get lice, consider re-treating them to make sure you kill off every last lice and their icky offspring that hatch seven to 10 days later.

Normally, the number of lice cases go up as kids wind down their summer camp days and head back into the classroom, where they may share hats, brushes, clothes and headbands that carry the itchy critters.

Which means, parents need to be more vigilant when it comes to checking what's on their child's head, especially with the new era of social distancing which could complicate simple lice checks at school.

"Parents can go online and see how to check their own children for lice if they are concerned," Said Dr. Polin. "More importantly, is parents maintaining an ongoing surveillance for their children. Because during the course of the year when their children are less than optimally socially distant, they are more likely to encounter other kids with lice, or clothing with lice on it, such as coats, and develop the infestation of the lice."

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